MxMo XCIII, January 26, 2015: Blue

With December’s theme of Apples still wafting through the blogosphere like freshly baked pie, we should move on to January’s Mixology Monday before that pleasant aroma dissipates. And if it does decrease, will we get sad? And can we embrace that sadness? Perhaps introducing our host for MxMo this month, Andrea of the Ginhound blog, might make this idea better understood.

This month’s theme slated for January 26th is one that will get you considering a certain area of the cocktail rainbow for the theme is “Blue.” Please read Andrea’s full announcement post, but here is a brief description:

January needs a bit of color – or perhaps the month after all the holiday mania makes you feel…blue? Either way this month’s Mixology Monday is a chance to live those emotions out. You can dazzle us with a brilliant blue drink or you can share that blue feeling with a melancholic drink.

Blue has been predicted as a new cocktail trend several times in recent years… But any mixer of blue drinks is faced with a bit of a dilemma as there is nothing “natural” about E133 – the most common of blue food colors: Do I really want to mix chemicals into my prefect mixture of fresh juices and good booze? Feel free to interpret blue as freely as you wish – if natural is the way you want to go blueberries, violets, cornflower or red cabbage could be good ingredients to work with.

This theme is rather cool because it allows the Tiki-philes to break out the blue curaçao and get all funky and festive with the drinks. Moreover, the fans of garden-to-glass can break out this past summer’s blueberry shrub or syrup (or use this past season’s glory via the frozen food aisle of the supermarket as I have done in the off-season). Have a bottle of Hpnotiq and not afraid to admit it? I bet there are some tasty uses for it. Don’t feel like buying a bottle of blue spirit? Well, blue food coloring can save the day! With all those options and more, there is something for everyone to join in on the fun. Briefly, here’s how to participate:

  • Find or create a recipe for a cocktail that demonstrates your take on the theme of blue, then post the recipe, and include a photo and your remarks, on your blog, tumblr, or website. If you lack one of those, feel free to post on eGullet’s Spirits and Cocktails forum.
  • Include the MxMo logo in your post — either the old school original or the funky blue one Andrea designed, plus links back to the Mixology Monday and Ginhound sites. Once the roundup post is put up, updating your post to include a link to that one as well would be appreciated.
  • Let Andrea know about your post before midnight on Monday night, January 26th (Denmark time) by posting a link to your post in the comment section on her post, emailing her at andreadoria56-at-gmail.com, or by tweeting at her via @husejer.

That gives us all two weeks to start thinking of cocktails on the short end of the visible wavelength spectrum or on the short end of joyousness. I am definitely curious to see what refreshing libations you, your curiosity, and your colorful liquor cabinet shelves can come up with!

 

MxMo XCII, December 15, 2014: Apples

With November’s lighter style of drinks, the Shim, under our belts, it’s time to keep on drinking through the Holiday season. Perhaps you will keep it lighter like last month or old and stiff like the days of yore; no need to drink benevolently here, but feel free to drink with malus. Perhaps introducing our host for MxMo this month, well me — Frederic of the CocktailVirgin blog, might make this idea better understood.

This month’s theme slated for December 15th is one that will get you looking at all things orchardy for the theme is “Apples.” Please read Frederic’s full announcement post, but here is a brief description:

Apples have been an American booze staple with Johnny Appleseed as its symbolic hero. John Chapman became that legend by planting apple tree nurseries across the northern Appalachia and the Midwest. He did not choose grafting techniques to reproduce sweet edible ones, but bred them to make sour apples perfect for cider and applejack. Michael Pollan in The Botany of Desire proclaimed, “Really, what Johnny Appleseed was doing and the reason he was welcome in every cabin in Ohio and Indiana was he was bringing the gift of alcohol to the frontier. He was our American Dionysus.” Apple products began to enter into the mixed drink literature in the 19th century with the Stone Fence appearing in Jerry Thomas’ Bartender Guide and got quite refined by the end of the century such as the Widow’s Kiss in George Kappeler’s Modern American Drinks. Indeed, apples have found their way into modern cocktails via Calvados, applejack, sparkling and still cider, apple butter, and muddled apple.

While there are plenty of classic and new recipes that use applejack, Calvados, and cider, consider great complementary pairings like apple products with Scotch, agave, Benedictine, and Yellow Chartreuse. Could you substitute champagne for sparkling cider, Calvados for Cognac, Laird’s Bonded for whiskey? Sure, feel free to make a riff on a classic as well. With all those options and more, there is something for everyone to join in on the fun. Briefly, here’s how to participate:

  1. Find or concoct a recipe that features apple as one of the star ingredients whether it be fresh, cooked, fermented, infused, or distilled, and then post the recipe, including a photo and your remarks, on your blog, tumblr, or website. If you lack one of those, feel free to post on eGullet’s Spirits and Cocktails forum.
  2. Include in your post the MxMo logo (whether the classic or any of the three apple ones provided here) and a link back to both the Mixology Monday and Cocktail Virgin sites. And once the round-up is posted, a link to that summary post would be appreciated.
  3. Submit a link one of three ways by midnight on December 15th — leave a comment on the announcement post, tweet Frederic at @cocktailvirgin, or send an email to yarm(at)verizon(dot)net.

That gives us two weeks to start making apple butter or scouring the shelves for artisinal applejack producers or anything in between! Light a candle for John Chapman, get out the paring knives and mixing vessels, and start tinkering! Or search the century and a half plus of apple-laden cocktail recipes available to mixologists. Oh so many ways to go about this! I am definitely curious to see what refreshing libations you and your curiosity can come up with…

MxMo XCI, November 17, 2014: Shims

With October’s theme of Perfect Symmetry still lingering as we eagerly await the wrap-up, there is little time to waste to get the next Mixology Monday rolling before Thanksgiving disrupts the cocktail blogosphere. And disruption is something we can do without, such as when drinking stiff drinks begins to take its toll. But does imbibing have to lead to that? Perhaps introducing our host for MxMo this month, Dinah of the bibulo.us blog, might make this idea better understood.

This month’s theme slated for November 17th is one that will get you considering the lighter side of cocktails for the theme is “Shims.” Please read Dinah’s full announcement post, but here is a brief description:

This month’s topic is near and dear to our hearts as it is our favorite type of lower-proof cocktails: shims! These drinks contain no more than half an ounce of strong spirits (i.e. those containing 40% ABV or above). Heavy-hitters are fun to drink, sure, but it’s way too easy to over-consume and under-enjoy when you’re playing hardball. Let’s stretch out our evenings and get to sample a bigger variety by lowering the proof without lowering our standards. Shims don’t require giving up on flavor, complexity, or—interestingly enough—even your favorite ingredients. Get a new understanding of your favorite high-proof spirit by using just a half or quarter ounce of it along with a milder leading player. Or take a low-proof character actor that usually supplements the main show and see if it can take the lead… By their nature, lower alcohol drinks, especially those using wine-based main ingredients, are great choices for food pairings. If you’ve got the perfect accompaniment for your chosen cocktail, please share that with us too!

This theme and host pairing excites me for two reasons. First, Dinah was the host for the second Mixology Monday that I participated in back September 2008 for MxMo 31. Second, Dinah crossed over last year from blogger to professional author with the release of her book on this MxMo’s theme, namely The Art of the Shim: Low-Alcohol Cocktails to Keep You Level (Amazon link). Getting that book could be a start to approaching that theme, but looking to your aromatized wine, sherry, and madeira shelf could be a start. Or perhaps inverting a booze-forward classic into a lighter libation? Champagne cocktails? Oh my! With all those options and more, there is something for everyone to join in on the fun. Briefly, here’s how to participate:

  • Find or create a recipe for a cocktail that uses no more than half an ounce of strong spirits (i.e. those containing 40% ABV or above), then post the recipe, and include a photo and your remarks, on your blog, tumblr, or website. If you lack one of those, feel free to post on eGullet’s Spirits and Cocktails forum.
  • Include the MxMo logo in your post, plus links back to the Mixology Monday and bibulo.us sites. Once the roundup post is put up, updating your post to include a link to that one as well would be appreciated.
  • Let the Dinah know about your post before midnight on Monday night, November 17th (with late submissions apparently welcome) by posting a link to your post in the comment section on her post or by tweeting at her via @bibulous.

That gives us all two weeks to start thinking of lighter ABV cocktails to try, and with the lower octane involved, feel free to tinker a bit more than usual to get things right. I am definitely curious to see what refreshing libations you and your curiosity can come up with!

MxMo XC, October 20, 2014: Perfect Symmetry

With September’s theme of “The Unknown” just slipping off into the sunset, what if we consider something a bit more known? Like improving on a drink to your taste by splitting an ingredient with another. It might not be everybody’s concept of perfection, but it is closer to yours. Perhaps introducing our host for MxMo this month, Joel of the Southern Ash blog, might make this idea better understood.

This month’s theme slated for October 20th is one that will get you looking at your liquor shelves for spiritous cousins for the theme is “Perfect Symmetry.” Please read Joel’s full announcement post, but here is a brief description:

Perfect symmetry is your theme this month!  A “perfect” drink splits the liquor or liqueur evenly between two related ingredients.  The most common “perfect” drink is a Perfect Manhattan where the vermouth is split between sweet and dry to create an altogether different experience.  A perfect Old Fashioned splits the bourbon and rye are both used to create a singularly distinct experience. When done well, splitting the liquor lets each of the unique flavors and components of the shine through.  Because they share a background, they don’t war with each other but instead you get both the mellow sweetness of the bourbon with the spicy backbone of the rye in that Old Fashioned… Why make a choice when you can have it all?! Your challenge is to create a new cocktail or explore an existing cocktail that splits the liquor or liqueur evenly in a “perfect” manner…  Can you challenge yourself with gin and vodka in a light summer appropriate beverage?  Perhaps you’ll delve deep into splitting Sambuca and ouzo in an anise-flavored digestive? Getting bored with tequila, maybe a perfect margarita with the backbone of mezcal will reawaken your appreciation? Campari too assertive for you?  Maybe make a Perfect Negroni with Aperol lightening the weight. Let you imagination run wild!

While that description, so many pairings come to mind like Green and Yellow Chartreuses, Lillet Blanc and Rouge, gin and genever, and never mind rum combinations (including rum-like spirits like cachaça). Perhaps split more than one ingredient in the recipe to make something even more complex? With all those options and more, there is something for everyone to join in on the fun. Briefly, here’s how to participate:

  1. Find or create a recipe that has “Perfect” (or split base spirit or liqueur) component, and then post the recipe, including a photo and your remarks, on your blog, tumblr, or website. If you lack one of those, feel free to post on eGullet’s Spirits and Cocktails forum.
  2. Include the MxMo logo in your post, plus links back to the Mixology Monday and Southern Ash sites. Once the roundup post is put up, updating your post to include a link to that one as well would be appreciated.
  3. Submit a link one of three ways by midnight on October 20th — leave a comment on the announcement post, send an email to southernashblog(at)gmail(dot)com, or tweet Joel at @Southerashblog.

That gives us two weeks to concoct “perfect” cocktails. Wait, that sounds a little lofty, but remember that we’re splitting spirits and liqueurs, not splitting atoms here. Is Fernet Branca too much for you? Is there perhaps another amaro to sooth the savage beast? Can’t figure out if lemon or lime juice would complement the spirit and other components more? Why not use both? Does “cherry liqueur” in that old recipe mean Heering or Maraschino, or why bother choosing? I am eagerly looking forward to what this herd of cats can conjure up!

MxMo LXXXIX, September 22, 2014: The Unknown

With recent Mixology Monday themes of familiar ingredients like “coconuts” and “pineapple,” what if there was something you were less familiar with? Could September bring a new ingredient challenge to everyone? How could a Mixology Monday host possibly figure out such an ingredient? Simple — he’ll let you figure out what is novel to you! Perhaps introducing our host for MxMo this month, Chris of the ABarAbove blog, might make this idea better understood.

This month’s theme slated for September 22nd is one that will get you searching for something new and untried for the theme is “The Unknown.” Please read Chris’ full announcement post, but here is a brief description:

Basically the idea is to try something new, an ingredient or technique that you’ve never had experience with before and create a cocktail around it… Use a spirit that you’ve never used before. It could be a base spirit, modifier or that Belgian Ale that rings in at 15% alcohol. Use an ingredient that has always captured your imagination in the supermarket. Maybe that weird looking fruit that you always walk by at Whole Foods, or that unusual looking vegetable that you can’t even pronounce. [or] Use a new technique that you’ve never tried, but have always wanted to. Have you been dying to make your own vermouth, amaro, or martini glass made completely out of flavored sugar.

Want to rummage through the shelves of ethnic supermarkets or the dusty bottles in the liquor store? I am sure plenty of options lurk in both cases. And there is probably plenty that you have seen or heard about but have never had the chance to try. Well, now is that time. Briefly, here’s how to participate:

  • Find or create a recipe for a cocktail that uses an ingredient, technique, or something else that’s completely new to you, then post the recipe, and include a photo and your remarks, on your blog, tumblr, or website. If you lack one of those, feel free to post on eGullet’s Spirits and Cocktails forum.
  • Include the MxMo logo in your post, plus links back to the Mixology Monday and ABarAbove sites. Once the roundup post is put up, updating your post to include a link to that one as well would be appreciated.
  • Let the Chris know about your post before midnight on Monday night, September 22nd by posting a link to your post in the comment section on his announcement post or by tweeting at him via @ABarAbove.

That gives us all two weeks to start looking around for novelty, reading technique books for the untried, and shopping for weird looking fruit and veggies. Indian grocers, roto-vaps and centrifuges, Azorean liqueurs — oh so many things to consider! I am definitely curious to see what refreshing libations you and your curiosity can come up with!